RVs parked at Holy Smoke Resort in the Black Hills of South Dakota with full hook ups

Holy Smoke Resort is for RV Travelers!

Let’s get to the nitty gritty. 

Here are a few of the technical reasons why we are the best place to park it for the night (or the weekend… or the week!) in the Black Hills.

  • With easy access just off Highway 16A, our affordable RV parking allows you to enjoy your stay in the Black Hills of South Dakota in comfort and seclusion. Perfect for those who are looking for a quiet, natural setting to rest your head.
  • Each of our 21 RV sites are pull through sites and range from 65’ to 78’ long with 30 and 50 AMP service – one of the few RV parks in western South Dakota that is able to accommodate the newest and larger RVs.
  • Holy Smoke Resort features full hook ups, water and sewer, satellite TV (let us know you want a rooftop sat friendly site!), and free wifi throughout the campground.
  • We are dog friendly! A designated dog run is available to give your pup a safe place to burn off energy when a walk just isn’t enough. Supervision of your furry friend is required.

Over the last two years, we have seen a dramatic increase in RV travelers. RVing has become a popular lifestyle and an affordable way for families to travel, create memories, and experience the United States. Most RVers enjoy the great outdoors – something the Black Hills of South Dakota is greatly known for. You’ll see wildlife on the property. Deer, fox, and wild turkey are the most common to hang around the area, but we have seen elk and mountain goats in the past. Hiking trails, mountain biking, and watersports (like paddleboarding or kayaking) are only a few of the reasons why our area is so popular among outdoor enthusiasts. Not to mention geocaching and scenic drives.

At Holy Smoke Resort we make it easy for RV and camper travelers to find a great place to stay during their family vacation, retirement getaway, or couples to retreat that is quiet and scenic, but still having easy access to amenities you need while away from home. We welcome every new RVer to our site and we promise you will be treated like family! Ask any questions you have about the area and the RV park when making your reservation and during your stay and we would be delighted to help you create the perfect vacation.

We know so much about RV travelers because South Dakota has a long-standing reputation among the RV community for being one of the most friendly and welcoming states in the country for RV travelers. And we do our very best to help uphold that repuation! With breathtaking scenic views and historical sites to see, Holy Smoke Resort outside of Keystone, South Dakota provides incredibly easy access to all the must-sees of South Dakota.

National Monuments and Parks

Favorite Family Attractions

Please, let us know how we can make your RV trip more enjoyable and your time in the Black Hills unforgettable.

Not an RVer, but still want to stay at Holy Smoke? We also have cabin rentals and vacation homes available.

Sturgis Motorcycle Rally - Main Street Sturgis, South Dakota

The Sturgis Motorcycle Rally

The Sturgis Motorcycle Rally (also known as Sturgis Bike Week, Sturgis Bike Rally, etc.) is hands down one of the most notorious motorcycle rallies in the United States. South Dakota locals will be able to tell you it’s one of the largest events within the state and west river South Dakota sees hundreds of thousands of motorcycle enthusiasts (on average around 500,000 people, with the high being over 700,000) from all over the country come to the Black Hills area over the course of ten days!

The Sturgis Rally started in 1938 by a group of Indian Motorcycle riders and initially began for stunts and races! Since then, The Rally has grown into the largest gathering of bikers in the United States; an event filled with vendors, concerts, parties, and introducing riders to the beautiful scenery of the Black Hills of South Dakota. Beginning the full first week of August every year, we look forward to our returning regulars and welcome newbies to the area.

Most bikers attending will drive campers, RVs, and trucks while towing a motorcycle trailer, then riding their bikes to and from Sturgis during the week; especially those traveling thousands of miles to South Dakota. Many visitors come to our area for more than just the motorcycle rally. Several opt to come before or stay after the Rally ends to enjoy Keystone and the surrounding Black Hills area’s family attractions, national parks, and outdoor activities – meaning that a camper, an RV, or an additional vehicle is a must-have during their vacation!

Black Hills Motorcycle Rides Map - 2021 Sturgis Rally editionBeing located in Keystone, South Dakota, Holy Smoke Resort is a prime spot to stay for these visitors. Our RV park offers 65 feet to 78 feet long pull-through sites, 50 amp service, full hook ups, water and sewer, free wifi, and electricity. Our cabins are equipped with modern facilities, are fully furnished, and have air conditioning. The best part is we are centrally located to everything you could want to see and do during your trip here in the Black Hills; including a gorgeous motorcycle route to Sturgis.

For our bikers, Black Hills Area Maps have been created to show various rides throughout the area along with an accompanying key to help you match your desired ride with your current skill level.

One of the favorite rides among intermediate riders includes Iron Mountain Road, which starts with Highway 16A – exactly where Holy Smoke is located! The route will take you through fun curves through the Black Hills and connects you to Highway 385, taking you into the historical towns of Lead and Deadwood, then finally through Boulder Canyon right into Sturgis.

Do you have time for a detour? More advanced riders enjoy the challenge of the Needles Highway. While on Highway 16A, you can venture West onto S. Playhouse Rd. which will have you on the second best scenic road in the Black Hills to ride – the Needles Highway. This route incorporates the natural beauty of western South Dakota, while the curves, dips, and inclines will upon your skill and savvy as a motorcyclist. After The Needles, you’ll be back to Highway 385 and you’re headed on the way to Lead and Deadwood.

Another popular question we receive is how to see Mount Rushmore! To ride through scenic views of Mount Rushmore National Memorial and the Crazy Horse Memorial, head South from Holy Smoke Resort toward Highway 244 which will lead you straight to the mountain of Presidents. Continuing West on Highway 244 will lead you to Highway 385, and you’ll be rewarded with the view of Crazy Horse Memorial. Staying on this road will land you right into the quaint town of Custer. Should you choose to venture through Custer State Park, we caution our motorcycle visitors… the buffalo are not a fan of the loud pipes! From Custer, you’ll be able to choose from several other ride options within the Black Hills area.

During the Rally, guided and group rides are also organized if you’re interested in meeting new people or don’t feel like riding solo the entire time.

The Sturgis Motorcycle Rally is an event we look forward to every year. The returning faces of past guests is always a treat and we love to hear what they’ve been up to over the past year. New riders, couples, and families find us and it’s a pleasure to meet new faces.

Holy Smoke Camp, Keystone South Dakota in 1911

The History of Holy Smoke Camp (Resort) in Keystone South Dakota

The Black Hills of South Dakota is rich with history.

From the Mount Rushmore National Monument, Crazy Horse Memorial, and the Paha Sapa – more commonly known as the Black Hills – there is our country’s history around every evergreen tree and our property, Holy Smoke Resort formerly Holy Smoke Camp, is no different.

It was 1874 when gold was discovered in the Black Hills and since then, our lovely area has been in continuous connection with some of the United State’s greatest known achievements in systematic gold mining.

Holy Smoke Camp, Keystone South Dakota in 1911Back in the day, The Golden Return Mining Company owned the Holy Smoke Camp and consisted of approximately 100 acres of land, right in the motherload of the Black Hills belt, where a number of buildings necessary for the operation of a gold mine were built. Whim houses, the superintendent’s home, the camp (aka miner’s quarters), a boarding house, a dynamite house, a blacksmith shop, stables – accommodating 24 horses, and numerous other buildings were constructed.

Gold bearing ores found on the property were free milling and refractory with the ledges on veins being all true fissures, increasing in width and richness as depth was attained. Free milling ores were treated by the ordinary stamp mill and amalgamating process while the refractory ores were treated by smelting.

Predominant historical figures are traced back to Holy Smoke Resort, Keystone, and the Black Hills of South Dakota. However, the most significant would be Colonel James A. “Big Hat” Clark.

Big Hat Clark was one of the most important mining men in the Black Hills during the 1900s. Today, because little history of early day Keystone has been saved, he has all but been forgotten. Clark came to Keystone in 1895 as a mining man, prospector, locator, and promoter for the Golden Return Mines. He gained the reputations as THE leading mine expert of the Black Hills and of America. He covered the entire west, from Mexico to Alaska, to prospect and report on the likelihood of a paying gold mine investment. Then, in 1904, he reached the pinnacle of his career here at Holy Smoke.

At the time, he managed the largest group of mines under one pan in Pennington County; nearly 3,700 acres of land! The largest portion lay west and northwest of Keystone, extending from Copper Mountain near Sheridan, to Harney City with one large section laying southwest of Keystone on Little Squaw Creek. The land encompassed everything near Keystone, covering a wide strip of the most valuable mineral section of the country.

However, as the years passed a lack of new gold left Clark struggling to raise funds for the mines. The struggle for investors reached its peak when Clark found himself stranded in Michigan. After explaining the situation to his good friend, John Boland, a box was set up in the store and all of Clark’s friends raised the needed money for him to come home; sacrificing what they could, as they were not people of means themselves. The poor miners had sold their violins, music boxes, and everything they could do without to get Clark back to Keystone. Boland would write down every item given and Clark saw they received as much of their money back as he was able to raise.

“He is truly one of our own and Keystone takes care of its own,” the people would say.

Unfortunately, Clark would soon sell the remaining horses in the stable and everything Clark could spare from his home was sold to pay bills. As Clark became older, he moved from the area to live with his only child.

Keystone will never forget this man and the promoter who added so much color to their lives.